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Auvergne Wine and Vineyards

Located in the middle of France, the Auvergne wine growing region is surrounded by extinct volcanoes. This ancient wine growing area of France produces little-known but very fine white, red and rosé French wines. These generally are light, fresh and fruity wines.


Auvergne wines have a strong character provided by the soil structure. This soil is foremost calcareous and much influenced by the volcanoes being numerous in the region. Vineyards in this Auvergne region of France are planted along the river Allier. The combination of all these elements allows the local wine makers to produce fine wines.
The most famous wines in the French region are the Cotes d’Auvergne and Saint-Pourçain. The red wines produced in Auvergne foremost use the Gamay varietal. Auvergne white wines are produced from the Chardonnay varietal and some others in the region use the famous Syrah grape.

Auvergne White Wines

Whites produced in auvergne are originating from the famous Chardonnay varietal. Sometimes these French wines are 13 or 14 % proof. They boast a “wooden” flavour and are of high quality.

Auvergne Rosé/ Vin gris

Produced from the Gamay varietal, these Auvergne wine is very fruity, dry and demands to be consumed when it is still young. Sip it chilled to really benefit from all its powerful taste.

Auvergne Red Wines

These authentic Auvergne wines are once again little-known but are really pleasant produce. Gamay and Pinot noir grapes are used to produce them, sometimes a blend of these two great grapes is used. This fine French wine is soft and fruity, some of them being more complex and structured though.

Wines from Auvergne are very little-known, even in France. You will be surprised by the quality of most of them and their very affordable prices. White, rosé and red wines from Auvergne are definitely an hidden treasure.


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